Excerpts from November 2012 Issue of Tritt Family Newsletter


TRITTS IN THE CIVIL WAR

Richard L. Tritt, Boiling Springs, Pennsylvania


As our country commemorates the 150'" anniversary of the Civil War, TFR thought that it would be appropriate to feature an article about Tritts we know who participated in the war, both for the North and South. Undoubtedly, this list will be incomplete, since it is based only on what information we have been able to gather. The list is also limited to those who spelled their name TRITT and not other variations. We also did not include soldiers whose mothers' maiden names were Tritt. We invite readers to submit to us any additional Civil War soldiers with the Tritt surname that are not included in this article or any corrections to the information that is given.

This stone farm house was built around 1790 near Newville by Peter Tritt (son of the immigrant Hans Peter Tritt) who was born in York County and settled in Cumberland County after his service in the Revolutionary War. It remained in the family for several generations. During the Civil War it was inhabited by his son, Major Samuel Tritt. During the Invasion of the Cumberland Valley in June 1863, Southern Army wagons came to the house in search of food for their men. The family had anticipated their arrival and dug a large opening in the ground and buried several wooden boxes, one filled with cured meats and the other with their best bedding, clothing, and other valuables. The boxes were covered with earth, making it look like a garden patch planted with young beet plants. Two men from the family had taken the family horses to Harrisburg because it was fortified by Union troops. One horse was left at home because it was too old to work, but the family loved it and the children liked to ride it. When the Southern soldiers came to the farm, the horse was hidden in a cornfield, but the soldiers found it and brought it to the house. The children were all crying because they thought their pet was going to be taken away. Their grandfather, Samuel Tritt, pleaded for the children, telling the soldiers the horse was not good for travel or hard work. His wife had dressed a wound on the leg of one of the officers of the supply wagons and had been kind to them all. So the officer in charge said, "We'll not take the horse; we will leave it for the children."

This poignant story was passed down through the family of Martha B. Munn, who was a granddaughter of Major Samuel Tritt. She and her family were living on her grandfather's farm when the Southern soldiers made their foraging visit.

The Tritt Civil War soldiers in this article are grouped by North and South, and then by the state for which they served. Each state list is organized alphabetically by first name, except for the two families in the Virginia listing. For some soldiers, the information is incomplete. There must be many known stories associated with these men. We encourage our readers to share them with us.

NORTHERN STATES

PENNSYLVANIA

Henry Tritt served as a Private in Company G of the 47th Pennsylvania Infantry. He enrolled at age 18 on June 30, 1863, at Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, and was mustered in on July 9, 1863, at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He was sick for a time at a hospital in Greencastle, Pennsylvania. He was mustered out with the Company on August 14, 1863. This was an emergency regiment formed during the summer of 1863 that was mustered out soon after the Battle of Gettysburg.

John Tritt served in Captain William Gracey's Independent Cavalry Company of Pennsylvania. He enrolled at Oakville, Pennsylvania, on September 12, 1862, at the age of 23. He was discharged on September 24, 1862.

John Tritt served in Company E of the 46th Pennsylvania Infantry, also known as the "Reading Rifles" from Berks County, Pennsylvania. He enrolled on August 14, 1861, at the age of 19. He was mustered in on September 4, 1861. He re-enlisted on January 12, 1864, and was discharged on July 16, 1865. John was a boatman from Reading, Pennsylvania. He was 5 feet, 6 inches tall, of light complexion, and dark haired with blue eyes.

John B. Tritt served in the First Battalion of the 187th Pennsylvania Regiment. The company nickname was "Pope's Fencibles" He enrolled at Newville, Pennsylvania and was mustered in on June 29, 1863, for a six month enlistment.

John L. Tritt was a Private in Company K of the 201st Pennsylvania Regiment. He was mustered in on August 20, 1864, and discharged on June 21, 1865. The 201st was recruited from Cumberland, Franklin and Lebanon Counties.

John S. Tritt served in Company F of the 158th Pennsylvania Regiment. This company was nicknamed the "Oakville Guards." He was enrolled at Carlisle on October 15, 1862, at age 31, and mustered in on November 1, 1862, at Camp McClure. The Regiment served first in North Carolina and afterward it served with General Meade in the Army of the Potomac until Lee was driven into Virginia. John was discharged on May 16, 1863, on a Surgical Certificate.

Samuel A. Tritt enrolled in Company C of the 158th Pennsylvania at Carlisle on October 16, 1862, at the age of 28. His company was also known as the "Cumberland Guards." He was mustered in on November 1, 1862, and discharged by special order on November 20, 1862.

William Henry Jarring Tritt was in Company D of the 130th Pennsylvania Regiment. The company nickname was the "Shippensburg Guards." He enrolled at Shippensburg on August 4, 1862, and was mustered in at Harrisburg on August 10, 1862, at age 20. The 130th Pennsylvania served at Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. He was mustered out with the company on May 21, 1863. He enlisted again, serving with the 201st Pennsylvania Regiment in Company K as a Corporal from August 20, 1864, to June 21, 1865. After the war, he moved to Los Angeles, California.

William M. Tritt of Newville, Pennsylvania, was a member of Company F of the 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry. He enrolled on September 15, 1862, and was mustered in on September 23, 1862, at age 24. The 17th Pennsylvania served in Devinís (Iron) Brigade, with Hooker at Chancellorsville, and with Buford at Gettysburg. The 17th served with Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley at the end of the war. William received a disability discharge on April 11, 1864.

OHIO

Ezra Tritt entered service as a Private at the age of 23 on August 8, 1862. He was appointed to Full 1st Sergeant of Company G, 95'" Regiment, Ohio Infantry, on August 19, 1862. He was discharged on October 14, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, on a surgeon's certificate of disability.

Jacob A. Tritt was a Private in Company B of the Ohio 67th Infantry Regiment. He entered service at age 18 on February 6, 1864. He was mustered out with his company on December 7, 1865, at City Point, Virginia.

John H. Tritt of Middletown Township, Columbiana County, Ohio, served in Company I of the 42nd Regiment, Ohio Infantry. He entered service at age 40 on September 21 1861. He died of disease on April 14, 1862, at Louisville, Kentucky.

Peter Tritt, was a Private in Company I of the 115th Regiment, Ohio Infantry. He entered service at the age of 33 on August 22, 1862. He served for three years and was mustered out with the Company on June 22, 1865, at Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

Robert Tritt was a Private in Company K of the 173rd Regiment, Ohio Infantry. He entered service on August 31, 1864, at age 39. He was mustered out with the Company on June 26, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee.

William H. Tritt of Ohio served in Company C of the 11th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was mustered in at age 22 on July 1, 1861, at Camp Dennison, Ohio, for 3 years. He was a Corporal and served until mustered out on June 21, 1864, because of a gunshot wound to his right shoulder that he received on May 14, 1864, at Burnt Hickory, Georgia.

William M. Tritt was a Private in Company K of the 104th Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was mustered in on August 11, 1862, at Massillon, Ohio, and was discharged with his company at Greensboro, North Carolina, on June 17, 1865. During his service he served as a teamster but was often ill and was hospitalized a number of times. He applied for an Invalid Pension in 1880 because he was totally disabled from a chronic condition that developed from exposure to inclement weather and hard service while he was serving in Kentucky in 1863.

WISCONSIN

William Lloyd Tritt of Winnebago County, Wisconsin, served his country faithfully in the Civil War. He enlisted on August 14, 1862, in Company F of the 21st Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. Among the battles in which he participated were Perryville, Hoover's Gap, Nashville, Murfreesboro and Chattanooga. At Chattanooga he was taken prisoner and confined for 17 months in the prisons of Richmond, Andersonville, Florence and Goldsborough. He was one of the few who survived the terrible treatment and starvation. After his release he remained in the hospital in St. Louis for some time. He was honorably discharged on June 14, 1865. During his imprisonment, he kept a diary hidden in his boot that encompassed the year 1864. This tiny book was passed down through his family and first published by Tritt Family Research in 1987 and is still available. (See order form elsewhere herein) William Tritt died on August 5, 1909, at the age of 90. He established the Tritt family in Wisconsin where a number of his descendants remain today.

KANSAS

Clark Tritt served in Company F of the 12th Kansas Volunteer Infantry. He was also a veteran of the Mexican War (Battle of Veracruz) and was severely wounded fighting Indians in 1851. He was a pensioner due to his injuries. In 1971, Estil Tritt of New Blaine, Arkansas, owned the cane used by Clark. It is handmade and the handle is made from a deer horn. Estil said Clark possibly had some toes amputated.

Felix M. Tritt was a Private in Company E of the 5th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry, from September 1, 1861, to September 8, 1864, and again from October 1, 1864 to December 6, I865, in Company E, 16th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry. His pension papers describe him as 5 feet, 8 inches tall, light complexion and hair, and gray eyes. He was disabled by a rupture (hernia) and had heart disease.

Francis Marion Tritt enlisted at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on September 16, 1863, and was discharged October 19, 1865. He served as a Private in Company I, 15th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry. He applied for his pension in 1912.

MISSOURI

Burguoine Green Tritt was born in Lee County, Virginia, but his family moved to Vigo City, Indiana, when he was young. On September 20, 1862, he enlisted as a Private in Company H of the 1" Engineers Regiment, Missouri. He served in several battles and was mustered out at Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1864. He then returned to his farm in Indiana.

SOUTHERN STATES

VIRGINIA

A number of Tritts from Lee County, Virginia, served in the Confederate Army. Many served in the 64th Virginia Mounted Infantry Regiment. This regiment and its precursor unit, the 21st Virginia Infantry Battalion, were recruited in the autumn of 1861 in Lee, Scott, Wise and Buchanan Counties. The 64th served as an infantry regiment, a cavalry regiment, and a mounted infantry (dragoon) unit. Apparently this unit was organized primarily to guard the mountain passes into Lee County from the North because the men were promised that they would serve only in their home area. The men zealously guarded this right to remain in their home area throughout the war. Protecting their homes and feeding their families was their top priority and they thought nothing of leaving their unit to go home for spring planting or fall harvesting.

The 64th Virginia Mounted Infantry was formally created on December 14, 1862, by the consolidation of the 21st and 29th Battalions of Virginia Infantry. The Regiment was reorganized September 1, 1863, at Cumberland Gap and after that date it was also called the 64th Virginia Cavalry.

Samuel M. Tritt, Sr. and his wife, Mary "Polly" Thompson Tritt, of Lee County, Virginia, saw all four of their sons go off to war. Their sons who served were:

Alexander L. Tritt enlisted at Camp Lane on September 16, 1861. He was a Private in Company A of the 64th Virginia Infantry Regiment. He was captured at the surrender of Cumberland Gap on September 9, 1863, and sent to prison at Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois. Alexander died there from pneumonia on April 2, 1865, just a few days before the end of the war. He is one of about 6,000 Confederate soldiers buried at Oak Wood Cemetery, Chicago.

William Thorp Tritt enlisted August 13, 1862. He was a 2nd Lieutenant, serving in Company G of the 64th Virginia. He was also captured at the surrender of Cumberland Gap on September 9, 1863. He escaped by stealing a Yankee soldier's horse. This soldier tracked William to his home in Lee County and demanded that his horse be returned. William was arrested and sent to Louisville Military Prison on September 23, 1863. On October 15, he was transferred to Johnson's Island, Ohio, where he remained until being released on June 12, 1864. William was plagued by health problems related to the war for the remainder of his life. (William Tritt's granddaughter was Lorene Tritt Wagner, of Johnson City, Tennessee. She attended several Tritt Family Research meetings and provided much of the information that we have about the Virginia Tritts.)

James Everett Tritt enlisted August 3, 1862, and served as a Private in Company G of the 64th Virginia. At some point in time, James grew weary of the fighting and decided to go home, which he did.

Samuel M. Tritt, Jr. enlisted April 1, 1864, at the age of 16. He served as a Private in Company F of the 64th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry. At the war's end, he surrendered and was paroled at Cumberland Gap on April 28, 1865. Since his horse had been confiscated, Samuel walked the fifty-some miles to his home in eastern Lee County. He drew a Confederate Pension of $30 annually. (Samuel was the great-grandfather of Carline L. Agee of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, who provided much of the information about the Virginia Civil War Tritts.)

Jacob E. Tritt, Sr., the younger brother of Samuel Tritt, Sr., also sent four of his sons off to war. For the most part, they also served in the 64th Regiment, Virginia Infantry. His sons were:

John Tritt enlisted on August 13, 1862, and served as a Private in Company I of the 64th Mounted Infantry. He was paroled at Cumberland Gap on April 28, I865. He had also served in Company A of the 94th Virginia Militia.

Isaac Tritt of Lee County, Virginia, enlisted September 1, 1862, at the age of 36. He served as a Private in Company I of the 64th Infantry Regiment. He was later commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in Company C of the 29th Virginia Infantry Battalion.

William R. Tritt served as a Private in Company A of the 94th Virginia Militia Infantry Regiment.

Jacob E. Tritt, Jr. enlisted on August 13, 1862. He served as a Private in Company G of the 64th Cavalry. He was taken prisoner at the surrender of Cumberland Gap on September 9, 1863, and sent to Camp Douglas in Chicago where he was held until his death from smallpox on February 18, 1865. He had also served in the 94th Virginia Militia, Company A, and the 21st Virginia Infantry Battalion.

We know of three other Tritts from Virginia who served. We do not know how they are related to the Tritts listed above. They are:

Alexander Tritt enlisted in Company I of the 65th Virginia Regiment. He was taken prisoner at Cumberland Gap and sent to Camp Douglas in Chicago on September 24, 1863. He was released on June 15, 1865, after taking the Oath of Allegiance.

James Tritt enlisted on August 13, 1862. He served in Company I of the 64th Regiment, Virginia Infantry. He deserted before June 30, 1864.

Zion Tritt enlisted October 1, 1863, and served as a Private in the 64th Cavalry, Company I. He deserted on October 18, 1863.

NORTH CAROLINA

A.W. Tritt of Macon County, North Carolina, enlisted as a Private in Company A, North Carolina 7th Cavalry Battalion, on March 9, 1863, and transferred into Company E, 65th Infantry Regiment. He was mustered out on August 3, 1863.

Archibald C. Tritt served in Company F of the Thomas Legion Infantry of North Carolina. He enlisted in 1864.

Elcany Tritt of Alexander County, North Carolina, served in Company G of the 37th North Carolina Infantry Regiment. He enlisted on November 20, 1861, at age 24. He was promoted to Full Corporal on June 4, 1863. His rank was reduced to Private on January 1, 1864.

George W. Tritt of Alexander County, North Carolina, enlisted at age 23 as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 37th Infantry Regiment on November 20, 1861. He was promoted to Full Sergeant on January 1, 1864, but died on January 20, 1864.

Henry F. Tritt of Alexander County, North Carolina, enlisted as a Private at the age of 34 in Company G, North Carolina 37th Infantry Regiment on November 20, 1861. He was mustered out on July 21, 1862.

Henry T. Tritt of Caldwell County, North Carolina, enlisted at age 16 on April 28, 1864. He was a Private in Company E of the North Carolina 58th Infantry Regiment.

Lafayette Tritt was a Private in Company I of the North Carolina 62nd Infantry Regiment. He was captured and sent to Camp Douglas in Chicago where he died May 23, 1864.

William L. Tritt of Iredell County, North Carolina, enlisted as a Private on September 5, 1862, in Company G of the 37th Infantry Regiment of North Carolina. He was promoted to Full Corporal on January 15, 1864.

TENNESSEE

William H. Tritt enlisted as a Private in Company A of' the 2nd Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry. His dates of service are unknown.

We honor all those Tritts who served in this epic struggle; and we are thankful that our country was reunited and lives on as the United States of America.

 

 

 


From the President / Meeting Dates & Events / Newsletter / Family Records Form / Tritt Family History - Volumes III & IV
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